Don’t let other people’s mistakes put you off preparing your own Will.

Every once in a while there is an unfortunate case of somebody making a mistake when attempting to prepare their own Will. A recent case in Florida has been reported, quite literally, thousands of times through different law blogs as a “cautionary tale” of how things can go badly wrong when you try to prepare your own Will. You can look up the case of “Aldrich v. Basile” and you will see about 100,000 results with headings like

“Case Illustrates Dangers of Executing a Will Without Legal Assistance”
“Do-It-Yourself Wills: Cheap Now, Expensive Later?”
“Why Preprinted or Online Legal Forms Are Not Advisable”

I’ll explain my position on this very sad situation by firstly summarizing exactly where Ms Aldrich went wrong. In an E-Z Will kit form she listed some specific assets to go to her sister and if the sister were to predecease her, the list of assets would go to her brother. Then a few years later her sister died, so she updated that Will with a handwritten note that stated;

This is an addendum to my will dated April 5, 2004. Since my sister Mary jean Eaton has passed away, I reiterate that all my worldly possessions pass to my brother James Michael Aldrich, 2250 S. Palmetto, S. Daytona FL 32119.

There were two issues; firstly her original Will only covered the list of assets, not everything else. However, even though the handwritten update covered “all my worldly possessions” it was only signed in the presence of one witness not two and so was not accepted by the courts.blank paper

With respect to the first error, this is unfortunately a limitation of blank form kits, and this is why we steer people away from them – It is easy to forget things. It is important to not confuse a blank form kit with a fully interactive service that guides you through the process and checks for errors. When a person makes a mistake with an E-Z Will kit form it is a warning bell for using this type of form, not for trying to prepare one’s own Will using interactive software. If you use a service like ours this mistake is absolutely impossible to make.

But I personally feel that the second error reflects badly on the Florida Supreme Court. In their ruling the judge stated that

Unfortunately, I surmise that, although this is the correct result under Florida’s probate law, this result does not effectuate Ms. Aldrich’s true intent. While we are unable to legally consider Ms. Aldrich’s unenforceable handwritten note that was found attached to her previously drafted will, this note clearly demonstrates that Ms. Aldrich’s true intent was to pass all of her “worldly possessions” to her brother, James Michael Aldrich

Thankfully an increasing number of jurisdictions have introduced laws that try to respect the intent of the testator and they will not allow true intent to be over-ruled by a technicality. In this case, everybody knows what Ms Aldrich meant, everybody knows what she wanted, but the lawyers and the courts successfully managed to throw this out. The court declared that Ms Aldrich had died without a Will and gave a share of the estate to her nieces according to intestate law.

The judge actually stated that she was deciding the case contrary to the testator’s “true intent”, Ms Aldrich did not want any of her estate to pass to her nieces, they were never mentioned in any of her documents. One legal blogger was very critical of the decision claiming that;

Apparently, the court wished to inflict post-mortem punishment on the testator for engaging in DIY estate planning….The court blamed the “unfortunate result” on the fact that Ann did not seek legal assistance in creating her estate plan. 

So now to the reaction and estate planning lawyers are collectively rubbing their hands with glee and providing all kinds of examples of why trying to prepare your own Will is a mistake. Like this one

A lot of times clients come in saying they want something very simple,” says Rubin. “But then you find out their daughter had a baby by artificial reproductive technology. If the definition of ‘child’ in your will isn’t up-to-date, you could disinherit your grandchild.

The claim is nonsense. This clearly does not happen “a lot of times” and perhaps the conclusion should be that if this situation does not apply to you, you can safely go the “do-it-yourself” route.

They then go on to say

These are the conditions each state requires for a will to be considered valid. The standard in Florida is two witnesses.“Every state has its own quirky rules,” cautions Rubin

Actually…it’s not that quirky, every single state requires two witnesses. Across the internet, the scaremongering goes on with countless obscure examples of how attempting to prepare one’s own Will is going to lead to trouble. As an aside, the vast majority of challenges are to Wills prepared by estate planning lawyers but we rarely see “a cautionary tale for what can happen if you use a lawyer to prepare your Will”.

The fallout of this unfortunate case leads me to the following recommendations;

Do not be scared off from preparing your own Will. It isn’t as complicated as some people want you to believe. If you have a complicated family situation then you need legal advice, but most people do not. From time-to-time there will be an article in the media about somebody who made a mistake with a Will kit. This does not mean that preparing your own Will is a bad idea. Over 65% of people do not have an up-to-date Will in place, and many of these are under the mistaken impression that you must use a lawyer to prepare a Will. You should take things into your own hands and make sure that your Will is in place.

Do not use a blank do-it-yourself Will kit, there is a very significant likelihood that you will make a mistake or not cover all situations that need to be covered. Blank forms have way too many spaces that have to be completely correctly. When you see a Will completed through our service you can appreciate how complicated the document can be, with various trust clauses and powers to the Executor. If you do not have a legal education you would not be able to create a well drafted Will using these kits.

Do not use a handwritten note to express your wishes; it opens your estate up to challenges and it may not fulfil the requirements of a Last Will and Testament or Codicil.

Do not use a Codicil to make an update to a Will. Just create a new Will. If you use an online service like ours, you can just login, make the change and print off a new Will. It’s easy.

I just wish that common sense would have prevailed and that the courts would have respected the final wishes of Ann Aldrich. It’s a real shame that they wouldn’t.

Tim Hewson is the President and Founder of the LegalWills group of companies. Offering online interactive estate planning services through LegalWills.ca, USLegalWills.com and LegalWills.co.uk. Founded in 2001, these services have become market leaders helping hundreds of thousands of people prepare their important legal documents.

The cost of a Will – enter Walmart

In previous articles we have discussed the cost of a Will. How is it that we charge $34.95 or £24.95 when the exact same document created by a lawyer will cost anything up to $800 or £500? There are a variety of reasons for this; our costs are kept down because you are effectively writing the Will yourself, and the $800? well, that’s simply overcharging.Wal-mart

The line that is drawn between an online service like ours and going to a lawyer has now been blurred a little by two Canadian lawyers who have set up booths in Walmart. They are using software to create $99 Wills and they are trying to remove the intimidation factor out of Will writing by allowing you to simply walk in without an appointment and have your Will written for you. It’s a interesting approach because that’s exactly the same process by which the $800 Will is created; you provide some personal details and key decisions and the lawyer enters your details into some software and the Will is generated. In fact, this cut price approach is absolutely no different to any other lawyer, and the end result is no different to a Will written by any other lawyer, or a Will written using the service at LegalWills.ca. So why are they only charging $99? The Walmart lawyer explains

We don’t fault other lawyers. If we were doing two a week, we’d have to charge more

so let us understand this….the premium that somebody would pay to use a lawyer has no relationship with the quality of the end product, it’s simply because the lawyer has to charge more to sustain their business.

So what do other lawyers make of this; a well known legal blog said

While a Wal-Mart will may sound like a “good deal”, one-stop estate planning at Wal-Mart may prove to be problematic, should these wills be challenged at some point in the future. Only time will tell.

may prove problematic? what does that mean? These Wills are written by a law firm, why would they be problematic? My guess is that it would be absolutely no more problematic than any other Will that has been written either using a lawyer or a service like the one at LegalWills.ca. It sounds to me like some vague scaremongering.

There are however, a few inherent problems with a “walk-in” Will writing service. Most people do not know all of the answers to all of the questions without a little consideration. For example, naming an alternate Executor, bequests to charities, guardians for children. Some of these things take some real thought and are not answers that you would like to give on the fly.

The final question remains; is $99 a fair price? Well you could pay $99 and save hundreds of dollars, or you could just put your details into the software yourself and save yourself even more. LegalWills.ca allows you to do exactly that for $34.95, from the comfort of your own home. You can take as long as you like to get things precisely the way you want them to, and most importantly you can make updates whenever the need arises, by simply logging into your account, making the change and printing off a new Will. USLegalWills.com offers the same for $34.95 and LegalWills.co.uk is available for UK customers at £24.95.

The options are quite clear. The final document is exactly the same but you can pay a lawyer $600 to enter your information into the Will making software (they have an office to maintain), you can pay Walmart $99 to enter your information into the Will making software (they do thousands, so they can afford to be cheaper), or you can do it yourself for $34.95.

The scourge of the online Will kit

Here’s the problem; everybody needs a Will, but lawyers are too expensive and inconvenient. As a result 65 percent of people don’t have a Will. To address this issue, countless “downloadable Will forms” proliferate across the internet. People use these forms and their loved ones end up with a mountain of trouble.

Let’s explore the evidence;

Are lawyers really too expensive or inconvenient? According to the customers who come to LegalWills, yes, absolutely. They are being quoted anything up to $1200 or £800 for a simple Last Will and Testament, but more commonly it is in the region of $600 or £400. The more significant problem is that updates are being charged anything up to $100 or £50 per change. There is also a gap between what lawyers think people can pay, and what people are prepared to pay. I read this recently on a legal blog, written by an estate planning lawyer

At least once a week I get a call from a potential client. The question is always the same: “How much does X document cost?” This is always a perplexing question. Usually the answer is “I don’t know.”

I know of an attorney who agrees to quote the client a price over the phone if they can answer one simple question: “What color tie am I wearing today?” …This lawyer knows that people will protest- “how can I know what color tie you are wearing if I am not there?” The lawyer then points out (if the client has not gotten it already) that both questions are similar.

So here’s the disconnect; the lawyer thinks he is clever and the client is a bit dim. The prospective client on the other hand wants to know whether they should include in their household budget some money to prepare a Last Will and Testament. In order to do this, they need to get a feel for how much it will cost. I cannot think of any other situation where you would blindly procure a service, hand over your wallet and ask the service provider to charge you whatever they want (veterinarians and dentists aside!).

So most people end up without a Last Will and Testament in place, and of those that do, most are not kept up to date. So we find service providers offering a “downloadable Will” sometimes free of charge. I saw a new one just last week – I have embedded a screenshot of the body of it here. Last Will and TestamentThey have tried to convey some authenticity with some calligraphy at the top and an impenetrable legal sentence to kick off the document

 

I JOHN DOE KNOW ALL PERSONS BY THESE PRESENTS:

 

But the meat of the document comes in article IV, where you are given space to explain how you would like your estate to be distributed. Personally, I feel that this document should be illegal; it is preying on people who don’t want to pay for legal advice and who are trusting this company to provide them with a legally binding document. But it is nothing short of impossible to complete a satisfactory Will using a blank page like this. You need to create alternate plans, trusts, Executor powers, residual plans and without these you end up with an estate like Ann Aldrich who used E-Z Legal Forms to prepare her Will. She listed out her possessions and instructed all of these things to go to her beneficiary. Unfortunately she didn’t explain what should happen to everything else. The result was a family battle over her estate and a judgement that included this warning “I therefore take this opportunity to highlight a cautionary tale of the potential dangers of utilizing pre-printed forms”

Fortunately, there is a very large middle ground between expensive lawyers and dangerous blank forms, and this is being filled by interactive services like the ones at LegalWills.ca, LegalWills.co.uk and USLegalWills.com. These services guide you through the process with a series of questions, and then verifies that you have covered all scenarios. It only allows you to do things that your jurisdiction permits, and double checks for things like minor children having guardians and trusts set up appropriately. Clearly some people still need expensive legal advice and custom clauses to be written, but services like this work for the vast majority. So much so, that when a recent study from Oxford University listed the most likely jobs to be replaced by technology, paralegals were 4th on the list with a 94% probability of being replaced by software. Most people who have a Will written by a legal professional have their information typed into software and their Will generated from templates (the staff in the office usually do it), but online services like LegalWills are granting access to those tools directly to the consumer.

People are not likely to use a lawyer who refuses to tell them how much they will charge. But we are hoping that we can steer people away from blank form kits.

 

You may not need legal advice to write a Will

I received an interesting comment from somebody recently;

“I learned of a woman who did a Will through this process but was not advised about how to care for her disabled child when she passed. No Hensen trust was set up for the child. In my personal and professional experience, a person should receive legal advice when preparing a Will”

This comment actually makes no sense. We would agree that this particular person should have received legal advice in preparing their Will. In fact, one of the questions we ask up-front is whether there are special needs children to care for within the Will. If there are, then we would explain to that individual that our service is not a good fit for them, and that they should indeed seek legal advice. But does that therefore mean that everybody needs legal advice to write a Will? Of course not. The vast majority of the users of our service need a Will that leaves everything to their spouse, and if something were to happen to both parents, then the estate would be distributed between their children. Guardians should be named, and possibly trusts for minor beneficiaries. But a Will covering this situation is straightforward and can be written using our service in about 20 minutes. In fact, if you went to a legal professional to prepare this type of Will, you would be paying way more than you need to.lawyer

Of course there are are complicated family situations that would benefit from legal advice, but scaremongering everybody into paying for a lawyer leaves us with a situation where about 70% of adults do not have an up-to-date Will. The vast majority of those people could quite easily use our service to fit their estate planning needs.

But the counter argument would be “ahhh, but how does a person know if they need legal advice or not?” At LegalWills.ca, LegalWills.co.uk and USLegalWills.com we provide a list of circumstances under which we recommend that a person seek legal advice and not use our service. These include; planning to disinherit a spouse, a history of mental illness, children with special needs or if you think that there may be a challenge to the Will, or have any doubts whatsoever about your situation.

Our advice would be that although you may have heard of somebody needing legal advice to prepare their Will, you shouldn’t feel that this situation applies to you. And you shouldn’t let the thought of booking an appointment with a lawyer put you off preparing your Will. You can have a Will in your hands in about 20 minutes at LegalWills.ca, LegalWills.co.uk and USLegalWills.com

Doing something great with your Last Will and Testament

There have been some wonderful examples recently of people using their Last Will and Testament to make lasting change in the World. The first one I saw was “Town is left £2m legacy by terminally ill banker to help keep it ‘beautiful’. According to the article “When banker Keith Owen was diagnosed with cancer and given only eight weeks to live, he started to think of ways to leave his mark. In the end he said it with flowers – one million of them to be precise – leaving them to the seaside town he had fallen in love with. Shortly before his death, Mr Owen, 69, a Canadian citizen, took the astonishingly generous decision to change his will and leave his £2.3million fortune to Sidmouth in Devon.” He now wants residents of the town to embark on a project to plant 1 million bulbs.flowers

Then there was the story of an elderly lady who left an alarm clock to a hospital, but in it, she had stuffed $10k in cash and a $7k gold bar.

In Wales, Bob and Flora Livsey left £550,000 to go towards services at Glan Clwyd Hospital, Bodelwyddan. It will help fund a catheter laboratory which is due to open next year.

And then, a couple of weeks ago the story of the Toronto Woman, who left her life savings to police dogs and horses. This story in particular describes something of the thought processes behind charitable bequests;

“She’d earlier intended to leave her money to an animal sanctuary, but changed her mind after reading an unfavourable story about it in the newspaper. She then decided to give it to the Toronto Zoo. But again changed her mind after reading a story about the elephants leaving the zoo.”

The article also explains the lack of constraints imposed by the legacy “she wasn’t specific about how the money was to be used — just that it was to benefit the care of the 27 police horses and 32 police dogs. Police have been looking at several options, such as new saddle blankets for the horses. “It’s things like that which really fit into the spirit of what she wanted, I feel this is a real responsibility she’s entrusted me to look after … these are her life savings, so it certainly makes us feel even more concerned that it goes to what she wanted.’”

These few examples demonstrate how much positive difference can be made when preparing one’s Will. For many people, money is tight, and finding spare funds for charitable donations throughout the year can be challenging. But including a legacy within a Will is a painless way to show your appreciation for an organization that has touched your life.

You can make a Will in about 20 minutes at www.legalwills.ca, www.legalwills.co.uk and USLegalWills.com, and within that document, it is easy to set up a charitable bequest either as a fixed amount, or as a percentage or your estate.