What exactly is a Last Will and Testament?

One of the most common questions we receive at LegalWills is “do I need a lawyer’s stamp or something to make my Will a legal document?”. The easiest way to answer this question is to look at the legal statutes that define exactly what makes a random document an actual Will. Let’s take one from each country in which LegalWills operates;

In Ontario; the Succession Law Reform Act requires that “A will is valid only when it is in writing”. It then goes on to say a will is not valid unless,

(a) at its end it is signed by the testator or by some other person in his or her presence and by his or her direction;
(b) the testator makes or acknowledges the signature in the presence of two or more attesting witnesses present at the same time; and
(c) two or more of the attesting witnesses subscribe the will in the presence of the testator.

There are a few subtle qualifiers to this, for example, a member of the forces on active service is not required to have two witnesses, nor does a Will that is written entirely in one’s own handwriting – which is a useful provision for people stuck under a rock, but not advisable for anybody else. There is also some restriction on who can serve as a witness in that they must have no vested interested in the contents of the Will. There is no mention in the law of requiring the services of a lawyer, or notary to make the document legal. The law however does not allow for video Wills, a Will that is sung, or any other modern digital interpretations.

The UK Wills Act not surprisingly, has very similar provisions and the signing requirement are almost identical. But more jurisdictions are now accepting “intent” rather than strict compliance with the law. In California they have a “harmless error” provision that states

The will shall be treated as if it was executed in compliance with that paragraph if the proponent of the will establishes by clear and convincing evidence that, at the time the testator signed the will, the testator intended the will to constitute the testator’s will.

More a more jurisdictions are changing their laws to state that the intent of the Will-maker supersedes the formal requirements of a Will. For example, in BC recently section 80 was updated to include;

If a will was not executed in compliance with paragraph (1), the will shall be treated as if it was executed in compliance with that paragraph if the proponent of the will establishes by clear and convincing evidence that, at the time the testator signed the will, the testator intended the will to constitute the testator’s will.

What does all of this mean? the implications can be seen in this recent news article from Australia. “A Will typed into an iPhone ‘Notes’ app has been declared legally valid by the Supreme Court in Brisbane in a landmark legal ruling. In what may be a legal first in Queensland, and possibly Australia, the Supreme Court ruled that the will typed into the smartphone but not written out or signed would stand.” The article goes on to say “Although the will was not witnessed the court found it had been created on the iPhone by the man with the clear intention of it being legal and operative”.

Of course, we wouldn’t recommend testing the limits of the legal system to see which forms of Will would be acceptable, however, it is clear that there is no need to be intimated by the process of writing your Will. Services like those at LegalWills.ca, LegalWills.co.uk and USLegalWills.com offer a structured service to prepare your own Will. It relies on established legal precedents to create a Will identical to one prepared by a lawyer. We wouldn’t recommend writing a Will on a post-it note, but there is nothing to be afraid of when using a service like ours to prepare your own Will.