Six ways the law is a hundred years out of date

DPRI-1-1706-M1_fullwilllargeAs the owner of a company that allows people to prepare their own Will – online, at any time, there are many services we would love to add, but are continually stymied by a law that fundamentally hasn’t changed in centuries. We live in a smartphone, biometric, social World which is entirely ignored by our legal system. Which would be fine if our current system worked, but it is horribly inefficient and open to fraud and exploitation. Given the gaping holes in the way our Wills law works today you would think that lawmakers would be jumping all over new technology to make the system work. Here are just a few ways that the head-in-the-sand approach comes up short;

1. A Will must be printed on a piece of paper;
Today we have video, digital assets, countless online social activity and the only way a Will can be valid is if it’s printed on a piece of paper. an “innovation” that’s been around for a couple of thousand years. The most obvious shortcomings of paper are that it burns easily, doesn’t stand up to flooding very well, is very difficult to find, not secure, easy to forge, and is not easy to update. The single most common question we receive at LegalWills is “my Dad has just passed away, and I know he had a Will, how can we find it?”. It would be relatively easy for us to have an online repository of Wills encrypted with digital signatures and made available to Executors exactly when they are required. Unfortunately the law doesn’t allow for this and currently the only legal document is on a piece of paper – lost, burned, or blown away in a hurricane.

2. A Will must be signed by a handwritten signature
This is perhaps the most ridiculous shortcoming of our existing laws. A scrawled signature is currently the only way of proving that a Will belongs to the person making the Will. Which leads to cases like this , where somebody has to call in a “handwriting expert” to validate the Will because “There are four signatures on it and none of them actually look like any of his signatures.” We sign into our phones with fingerprints, and biometric data. My smartphone uses face recognition to log me in. I can buy a door handle on Amazon that uses “subdermal fingerprint scan technology”, yet according to the law, my entire estate is protected by a chicken scratch signature. You then end up with multi-million dollar properties being contested because claimants “maintain that it is fake and <the testator> never made one”. Or people like this former police officer who “has admitted fraud over a will said to belong to his dead father.” His Dad didn’t have a Will, his son typed one up and passed it off as his Dad’s. Granted, he was caught, but for every one of these there are thousands of fraudulent Wills being presented as originals.

3. The inclusion of digital assets
Lawyers are starting to acknowledge the importance of digital assets, but have yet to come up with a secure, convenient way to tie these together with a printed Will. Generally speaking it’s a really bad idea to include your Facebook account information in your Will (Wills are public record once you pass away), but online accounts can have significant value. Domain names are still sold for tens of thousands of dollars. PaddyPower, PayPal, Bitcoin, WordPress accounts can be worth a lot of money. And of course, families may end up fighting over Flickr, Picassa, Facebook and iTunes accounts, so they should really have a named beneficiary.

4. Global assets
We live in a very mobile World and people hold assets in multiple jurisdictions, and indeed in some cases may not even know which jurisdiction the assets are held in. If I own $500k in Bitcoin currency, is this subject to inheritance taxes of any country? what if I live part of the year in the UK, part of the year in Dubai, and have a house in Florida and have a PartyPoker account? I recently read this article about differences between English and Scottish law which explains “The EU has very recently introduced new rules to help clarify the position in complicated situations, where the law of two or more EU countries could apply. From August 2015, most EU citizens will be able to choose whether the law applicable …should be under the rules determined by the country of their residence or the country of their nationality. However, the United Kingdom has chosen to opt out of these regulations.” In other words the UK has opted out of a law that will come into effect in two years time that will solve a 50 year old problem. Good luck finding resolution to the issues of today’s digital assets.

5. The cost of a lawyer
Lawyers continue to overcharge for their services. In most cases a lawyer will have a client complete a blank form, put the information into some software and generate a standard boilerplate Will. And then charge $600 or £400. Not in every case of course, but a lawyer should be able to say to a client “you know, that was a really simple Will, let’s call it $25” but it won’t happen. We’ve had people come to us having been quoted $1,200 for a Will. It’s just out of touch with reality, especially as Wills should be reviewed at least annually and updated regularly.

6. Using the services of a lawyer
We can automate and “app-ify” many things today. Online and smartphone applications are breaking new ground daily and it not difficult to conclude that if Intuit can build TurboTax for business, it is not much of a stretch to address everybody’s estate planning needs with self service tools. At LegalWills.ca, LegalWills.co.uk and USLegalWills.com we provide a service that works for about eighty percent of people, and we direct people to legal professionals for anything complicated. But it is well within our technical capabilities to provide an online tool that works for 99.9% of the population, probably more effectively that the legal profession. A Will is something that everybody should have, access to a lawyer should not be a roadblock to preparing a Will.