The trouble with lawyers

The legal boys have won again
And you and I have lost
They can’t tell us how it happened
But they’ll let us know the cost

Elton John – Legal Boys

When our Last Will and Testament service is complimented for its convenience and affordability I feel a sense of pride, but I have to quickly follow up by explaining that our service is not only used by people who “cannot afford expensive legal fees”. It turns out that there is also a growing band of users who turn to our service because they simply don’t want to use a lawyer; they don’t like lawyers, and they don’t trust lawyers to give them a fair deal. The decision to use our service is not about cost; these people could afford to use a lawyer if they wanted to, and they could probably find the time to book an appointment, but it’s a general dislike of the profession. Of course, at LegalWills, we value the expertise of the legal network, and we often direct people to receive professional advice if their situation warrants it, but what is it with this distrust of lawyers? It seems that the legal profession need a PR makeover.

 

I was reminded of this recently when reading an article on the Canadian CBC website about the disgraced lawyer, Richard Chojnacki, who stole from his clients. The Law Society knew about it for six years, but did nothing. They have been accused of protecting one of their own, even as people were being robbed of their savings. Many lives were ruined unnecessarily as the Law Society sat on their hands, causing “6 years of hurt”. But the story wasn’t the main interest to me, rather it was the comments section. It reflects a public discontent with the legal profession;

“lawyers who are obviously accustomed to dragging things out for billing purposes”
“There is a reason why lawyers have a bad reputation and are hated”
“Who would have thought — a dishonest lawyer?”
“It is said that sharks will not eat lawyers as a professional courtesy”
“99% of all lawyers make the rest of them look bad”
“a lawyer who is dishonest and corrupt. Shocking!!!!”

The list of comments goes on. In fact, when I quickly looked up the list of the ten most distrusted professions, lawyers were sixth on the list, just behind psychics and ahead of car mechanics. There are also countless websites dedicated to “lawyer jokes” reinforcing that perception.

I am sure it was this story that prompted the Toronto Star to start its “Broken Trust” series of investigations into lawyers-turned-criminals, the headline of which is “The Toronto Star found that more than 230 lawyers sanctioned for criminal-like activity by the Law Society of Upper Canada in the last decade, stole, defrauded or diverted some $61 million held in trust funds for clients.”

I’m not sure that lawyers are any more dishonest than any other profession, maybe we hold lawyers to a higher standard because we trust them with our most personal affairs. However, there is certainly a justified perception that some lawyers will try to make as much money as a situation permits, and charge for every possible item. You only have to look at the Nortel bankruptcy in Canada where the legal arguments over how to split $7B in assets have moved the case no closer to a resolution than it was 5 years ago. It’s just the the $7B is much smaller now because $1.2 BILLION has been eaten away in legal fees. Just imagine how that kind of legal bill can be amassed; either a huge number of lawyers, or an unconscionable hourly rate.

I’m not sure when this distrust of the profession started, but in 1852 Charles Dickens published Bleak House, the story of a dispute over a Will which culminates in the estate being swallowed completely in legal fees. The inspiration for the story came from Dickens’ disillusionment of the legal community after working both within the system as a law clerk, and then working with lawyers to protect copyright of his work.

People come to us because they have been quoted as much as $1,200 for a “simple” estate plan. Other clients have come to us because some lawyers refuse to provide a quote claiming that it is impossible to say how much a Will is going to cost until is has been completed. These attitudes put people off, and that is why they are turning to services like LegalWills.ca, LegalWills.co.uk and USLegalWills.com. We can at least tell you that a Will costs $34.95 or £24.95, and we’ve paid the expensive lawyers to create the service so that you don’t have to.

Although our service works for the vast majority of people, some people still need legal advice to create their estate plan. We will always direct people to professionals when our service is not appropriate for their situation. I just wish the legal profession did a better job of presenting themselves to the public.

 

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