Fear and loathing of our Will service

There are generally two different reactions to our legal Will service and yesterday we experienced both. A lawyer tweeted yesterday about our service “Danger, Avoid”, and then an hour later somebody called into our customer service line and said “my mother had a Will written up when she was 85 and was charged $700, we have just re-done it using your service and it was almost verbatim compared to the $700 Will”. Let’s explore these two reactions.

The lawyer didn’t give too many details as to why our service was dangerous, or why it should be avoided, so we’ll have to make some assumptions. Let us assume that the lawyer felt that reducing the process of preparing a Will to a series of algorithms presented in a software package is an over-simplification – to some extent the lawyer may be correct. But what we do know is that it is actually quite unusual for a lawyer to hand-craft a new legal clause to go into a Will, most Wills drawn up by legal professionals are cut and pasted from known precedents. In fact, if you step into a lawyer’s office, you will be asked to complete a blank form, that is then punched into some software, and a Will is generated. In most cases the process is actually exactly the same as what we do. That is not to say that there can be fine-tuning of assets to lessen probate charges and tax liabilities, and more complex estates can benefit significantly from legal and financial advice to reduce the burden of those charges. But for many people the perceived advantage of this guidance is offset by the expense and inconvenience of seeking the advice.

Of course, if a special clause is required, or legal advice is needed, then we would always direct people to a legal professional, and under those circumstances, high legal fees may be warranted. However, in most cases, the process for creating a standard Will is actually far less complicated that filing one’s taxes, and I can imagine a decade or so ago, professional accountants having the same reaction to tax preparation software; “how can you reduce our expertise to a series of Q&A’s in software” but Intuit did it, and it has now become the go-to resource for most people. It is inevitable that more people will turn to software to prepare their Will given their experiences with dealing with legal professionals. And with that, let’s look at the other reaction.

Too often we hear of egregious over-charging by estate planning lawyers and this is ultimately what makes the service at LegalWills.ca, LegalWills.co.uk and USLegalWills.com so successful. We hear of people needing to change the name of their Executor on their existing Will, and being charged in excess of $500 to do this. We hear of 85 year old seniors, who simply want to leave everything to their daughter, being charged $700 for a simple Will.

I think it’s only fair to offer the other side to this discussion. Why would a lawyer charge $500 for what appears to be a minor update? The argument appears to be that the lawyer would effectively have to create a brand new Will because it is conceivable that laws or personal circumstances may have changed since the original Will was written. However, when the new Will looks identical to the original, people justifiably feel ripped off.

We are therefore left with a situation where 60-70% of people do not have a Will, and of those that do, most are not kept up to date. It is a document that everybody should have, so we clearly have a broken system.

We believe that our service currently addresses the needs of about 70% of the people needing a Will. It would be relatively straightforward to build software that could address the needs of 99 percent of the people needing a Will. There will of course still be a need for legal advice from trained professionals, and the hand-crafting of novel and unique legal clauses. But we do feel that the days of charging $600-$900 for a standard Will are thankfully drawing to a close.

For every complaint from the legal profession, we receive fifty thank-you’s from people who have used the services at www.legalwills.ca, www.legalwills.co.uk and www.uslegalwills.com. We feel that we offer a vital service and that for the vast majority of people, the end product of our service is every bit as good as a Will drawn up by a legal professional.

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Writing your Will isn’t about you…

We occasionally hear people explain that they haven’t prepared a Will because they don’t really care what happens after they have died – they’ll be dead. This attitude always dismays me a little because writing a Will isn’t about you – your Will is for your loved ones. The excuse is often followed up with “I don’t need a Will, it’s obvious what will happen to my things”. A recent news article highlighted why these approaches are so disrespectful to one’s family.

In Canada, you can claim a tax free spousal rollover from retirement savings, as long as it is all completed within a year. A 54 year old widower lost his wife to cancer, and was the Executor of the estate. According to the rules, he has to submit the paperwork with the bank; including the death certificate, Will and probably probate documents. In this case, the bank lost everything and he was supposed to follow up. But guess what; he has 3 children from 5 years old to 16 and he had just lost his wife. In his words “I was overwhelmed with worry, and the priorities were always the kids. I was reading up on what happens with kids after they lose their mom….Oh, God. There were too many emotions and too many other things happening with the kids.” In this unfortunate case, he simply lost track and was expected to pay tax on the $80,000 savings (the bank has since stepped in and offered to pay).

This expression of being overwhelmed is very common for loved ones when a family member passes away. Throughout these emotionally desperate times there is a funeral to arrange, banking, taxation, care for the family, the list is endless. Many people have a hard time filing their taxes at the best of times, so imagine trying to do it shortly after your partner has passed away.

There are two key points to understand. Firstly, taking care of the bureaucracy is usually much easier with a Will in place. Furthermore, the Will  allows you to choose an Executor for your estate, and given the emotional toll on your spouse, it may make sense to appoint another family member or trusted friend to take care of the paperwork.

I find it odd that people care so much for their loved ones while they are alive, but leave them with a legacy of problems by dying without a Will. It only takes about 20 minutes to write a Will at legalwills.ca, legalwills.co.uk and uslegalwills.com and costs less than dinner and a movie.

Writing a Will isn’t for your benefit, it is for your loved ones.

How to forge a Will

The title of course is tongue-in-cheek, but it seems that from all of the news lately, there has been a sudden spate of estate disputes and legal challenges. Either because a Will has been forged, signed under duress or written by somebody without the capacity to write the Will. These cases demonstrate that the prospect of an inheritance can bring out the worst in people, create rifts in families, and can result in very expensive legal battles that serve nobody other than the lawyers.

It starts with the bizarre trial of Peter/ Tony Chan who was convicted of forging the Will of Nina Wang – once Asia’s richest woman. Trying to forge a $4 Billion Will is a tricky crime to get away with, and it resulted in a 12 year jail sentence. But Mr Chan was not alone. Next was the Will of Harinder Singh Brar, Maharaja of Faridkot, with another $4 Billion estate. This time it was a team of staff members who connived to leave the entire estate to themselves in Trust, but the courts ruled that the Will was made under duress and therefore illegal.

However, it’s actually more likely that a Will would be manipulated or forged for a more modest estate, and this was the topic of a recent article in the Daily Telegraph discussing the rapid increase in legal battles over estates. There are three key reasons for this rise; firstly, the size of the average estate in the UK has risen from £150k to £265k in a decade. In addition, people are starting to depend on an inheritance as part of their own financial plan – consumer debt is rising and many are banking on an inheritance to get themselves out of debt. And finally, society in general has become more litigious over the years.

Contrary to popular opinion, writing a Will through an online service does not make the document any more likely to be challenged. In fact, just recently, a Will drawn up by a solicitor while in the presence of one daughter, was deemed invalid as the testator did not have mental capacity to write the Will. Turns out that the daughter (who happened to be a magistrate) put pressure on her mother to disinherit the other children. Oh, and she had to pay back the £18,000 in gifts she received in the last few months of her frail life. The real tragedy of this story though is that the estate was worth about £200k, and the whole lot disappeared in legal fees. The whole estate went to the lawyers.

There are some lessons to be taken from this troubling stories. Most importantly, write your Will when you are young enough and have the mental capacity to do it. People procrastinate with their Will writing, thinking that they will prepare it when they are older. We hear all the time people saying “fortunately, I don’t need a Will yet?”. Obviously you don’t, you don’t need a Will until you die, but it’s too late to write one then.

This is one of the reasons that online services like those offered by LegalWills.ca, USLegalWills.com and LegalWills.co.uk are becoming increasingly popular. They allow you to prepare your Will in your own time, on your own terms, but also allow you to update your Will throughout your life, as often as you wish. It makes sense to prepare a Will today, and then just update it as circumstances change.