Documenting your assets; online or paper?

The single most challenging job for an Executor of a Last Will and Testament is to gather up the estate. The estate is made up of land or buildings, financial accounts and policies, “chattels” (stuff that you own), and now, increasingly online accounts. If the list of assets is not written down or stored anywhere it is an impossible task, and the Executor has no way of knowing when the task is completed. As a result, the BBC reports that there is £15B in dormant bank accounts, The Bank of Canada have posted that they are currently looking after 1.3 Million unclaimed bank accounts waiting for a claim. And in the US, CNN reports that there is $58B in unclaimed assets sitting in State treasuries.

Each jurisdiction has its own way of dealing with these accounts; Canada probably has the most straightforward search through the Bank of Canada, the UK has a service called MyLostAccount set up by the British Bankers Association (but it’s a tedious service to work with) and the US has allowed free enterprise to encourage a variety of different services, headed by the non-profit National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators, with a service at unclaimed.org which allows you to search through different State treasuries.

Most of these unclaimed accounts are for people who have passed away, when the Executor knew nothing about them. The administration of the estate was completed without knowledge of those accounts, and the assets entered into an eternal limbo until the government claims them as their own. Given how widespread the issue is, and the billions of dollars at stake, what can be done to ensure that all of your assets reach your beneficiaries? There are, at a high level, two options;

Writing everything down on a piece of paper
The first point to note with this option is that under no circumstances should you describe details of all of your accounts in your Will. It would mean having to update your Will every time an asset changes including signing and witnessing the document, but more importantly, once probated, your Will is a public document so everybody will be able to read this detail. There have already been reports of scammers scouring probate records for login credentials written into Wills. What we therefore mean is writing everything down on a piece of paper and storing it with your Will; you can do this either on an ad-hoc basis or through a structured book like My LifeLocker.

The key advantage of this approach is that it is personal and confidential; you are not relying on any third party to store the information, so it is guaranteed to be safe. The disadvantage is that in keeping the document safe, it may never be found. Paper is not particularly durable either, so it may get lost in a house fire, flood or other natural disaster.

Using an online service
The alternative is to use an online service that offers to store your account information and passwords for you, and then release them at the appropriate time. Let me deal with the obvious disadvantages of this method first. You are handing all of your personal and financial details over to a third party. If somebody came to your front door and offered to look after your passwords for you, there is not a chance that you would take them up on the offer, so why would a website be any different? Some of these services are offered through overseas companies and you would quite frankly be insane to trust them. The company also has to last longer than you, which is this rapid world of startup booms and busts is statistically not likely. In our 14 years of operation we have seen companies offering this type of service come and go, and on the Digital Beyond blog they recently wrote about 26 companies that offered to keep your credentials safe for your loved ones (for a monthly fee) that have subsequently disappeared; AssetLock, E-Z-Safe, EstateLogic, Eternity Message, Futuristk, GreatGoodbye, if i die.org, Legacy Organiser, Life Document Storage, LifeStory.com, Lifestrand, Memorial Gardens, MemoValley, MentoMori, My Last Email, My Web Will, and MyInternetData.

But there are advantages to using a service like this. At LegalWills.ca, USLegalWills.com and LegalWills.co.uk we have teamed up with My LifeLocker to guide people through the process of documenting all of their assets including their online accounts, and then have tied this together with our proprietary Keyholder mechanism. You name a trusted keyholder who is given a unique securely generated key. They can then unlock your document at the appropriate time after going through the required security measures. The information is encrypted so it means that the right information gets in the right hands at the right time, and cannot be compromised. It is also easy to update by logging into your own secure account, the same account that you used to prepare your Last Will and Testament, Living Will and Power of Attorney.

So if you are going to use an online service, look firstly for one with longevity. Look for the usual industry seals like Better Business Bureau accreditation or maybe check out Ripoff reports at www.ripoffreport.com. Look for companies that are based in your home country and then check to see the type of security that they have in place. The recent Heartbleed Bug awakened many people to the risks of online accounts (we weren’t affected). Finally look at the actual mechanism for releasing the data; how is it guarded against unauthorized access.

Our Lifelocker service actually has the best of both worlds; you can print it and store the document on your bookshelf, and also have an online version available to your keyholders. Or just choose the one approach that works for your situation.

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The funnel to a successful estate plan

It’s an unfortunate reality that very few people end up with a perfectly executed estate plan. In an ideal world we would see every person’s assets being passed to the next generation in a way that represents their wishes, in reality there are a number of key steps to this process and consequently too many points of failure. This post will explore those steps and what we are doing at LegalWills to try and improve the numbers;

1. 65% of people don’t write their Will

This is of course the most significant leak in the funnel. The vast majority of people never create a Will because it is too expensive or inconvenient. As a result, people procrastinate thinking that they can get to it some time next year. Alternatively they wait until there is stability in their life because they think that the writing of a Will is something that they only want to do once in their life. We often hear from people who say “I will be getting married next Summer, should I hold off writing a Will until then?”. On the one hand, it is true that getting married will invalidate the Will in most jurisdictions, but there is never a time that a person should be without a Will. So we recommend that the Will is written today, updated when the person gets married, and updated every time they experience another major life event. Which brings us to the second issue – Funnel

2. Most Wills are not kept up to date

When a person visits a lawyer to prepare their Will, they can pay a significant amount of money and with that, they would expect the document to last quite some time, if not a lifetime. The reality of course is that the document can be out of date by the time the person gets home. There are many high profile examples of Wills not being updated with dire consequences; new children not being included, new partners, Executors who are no longer fit to serve. In fact, most celebrity Will disputes are caused by a Will not being updated to reflect new circumstances. A Will should not only be updated when there are changes in personal circumstances, but also when a life event happens to anybody named in the Will. It may be that the personal guardians for your children have moved across the country, had triplets of their own or for whatever reason are simply no longer the best choice. Many times we hear from people who explain that “I do have a Will but it was written twenty years ago, before we had children”, in which case, although they are one of the 35% with a Will, it is all but useless.

3. Many Wills are never found

The single most common question we receive at LegalWills for non-customers is “my father had a Will, but we don’t know where it is, how can we find it?” and the short answer is, you can’t. It doesn’t matter whether the Will is stored at home, or with a lawyer’s office, if the family and loved ones are not told where the Will is located, they have very little chance of finding it. We also hear from customers who aren’t sure how to revoke an old Will and explain that “I had a Will written 15 years ago with a lawyer, but I was living in a different city then, I’m not even sure that the lawyer is still there, how do I cancel this Will”. In this situation the testator can’t even find their Will, so there is no chance of a family being able to find it. So although this person is technically one of the 35% with a Will, it hasn’t been updated and it has no chance of being found.

4. The Executor has no idea how many assets there are

We are now left with less than 10% of the population; they have written their Will, they updated it regularly to reflect changes in their circumstances, their family and loved ones are able to find the Will when they need it, but now the Executor will have to find the assets. But there is no list of assets kept with the Will; so infrequently used bank accounts, online assets, dormant savings accounts, stock purchases, or even cash under the floorboards will never be found and never make their way to the beneficiaries. It is never a good idea to include a complete list of assets in the Will itself; they change frequently and you wouldn’t want to have to update the document every time a new account is opened, but the Executor needs to know when their job is complete.

At LegalWills.ca, LegalWills.co.uk and USLegalWills.com we have tried to solve these issues. Firstly, we created a service that allows you to write your legal Will for $34.95 or £24.95 from the comfort of your home. We then allow you to update the document by simply logging into your account, making the change, and printing a new document. We then allow you to create messages that can be distributed to key people after you have passed away, and this can include instructions for locating your Will. Finally we have teamed up with My Life Locker™; the Ultimate Life Organizational System. Using this service you are able to maintain a file of your personal assets which can then be accessed by designated keyholders™ only at the appropriate time. This ensures that all of your assets make their way to your beneficiaries.

Where are your assets?

Let us assume for now that you are one of the minority who has written your Last Will and Testament. Now let us assume that you are one of the few of that minority who has bothered to keep it up to date. There’s a good chance that your Will would say something like “I leave my entire estate to my husband John” or “I divide my estate equally between my two children Billy and Betty”.

Now imagine that something were to happen to you today. Would the person who you have named as the Executor in your Will be able to find all of your assets? How many financial accounts do you have? How many insurance policies? What about online accounts with financial assets (like PayPal, GoDaddy PaddyPower or eBay), how many online accounts with family memorabilia (like Flickr, Picassa or Shutterfly), accounts with material assets (like iTunes, Audible, Amazon). There used to be a time when your Executor would go through your mail and take a look at bank statements, but do you receive paper statements from your eTrade, Questrade, William Hill or Party Poker accounts?

Even the people closest to you may not know about every financial or material asset that you own, and if they do, they may struggle to gain access. If you write a Will using a lawyer or solicitor, and have named that legal professional as your Executor, do you let them know every time you open a new account? One of the most common questions we get at LegalWills is “my Dad wrote a Will with a lawyer, but we don’t know which one, how can we find it”. In these situations, the lawyer doesn’t even know that the person has died, so they almost certainly won’t have an up-to-date list of assets.

At LegalWills we are trying to bring Will writing into the twenty first century. Firstly, by letting people prepare their own legal documents at an affordable price for the comfort of their home, and then by letting them update them whenever circumstances change. But modern technology also allows us to do innovative things like integrate My Life Locker into our LegalWills services. My Life Locker allows you to keep an up-to-date record of your key contacts, assets, financial accounts and online accounts which can then be updated at any time, simply by logging into your account. You can at any time download and print your Life Locker and keep it somewhere safe in the house. Alternatively, you can create Keyholders™ and these people will be able to access your Life Locker at the appropriate time; once you have passed away.

If you’ve ever been an Executor, or have ever talked to somebody who has just administered an estate, you will know how difficult it can be to gather the assets, and how impossible it is to know when that task is complete. There are millions of bank accounts around the World sitting dormant because the account holders died, and nobody knew they existed. If you look at online account policies you will often see terms like this;

If we continue to deem your account inactive for a period of eighteen consecutive calendar months, in order to safeguard your monies, we may withhold any remaining monies in your account and close your account. You may contact us to reclaim any such withheld monies at any time

In other words, if you don’t use your account, the money is lost.

Thankfully with services like My Life Locker integrated within LegalWills.ca, USLegalWills.com and LegalWills.co.uk we can provide you with the tools to ensure that all of your assets can reach your beneficiaries.

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